Best Gaming Computer: Schools of Thought

With the current advancement in the computer gaming industry, more and more people are contemplating on what are the best specifications to include in their gaming PC. After all, in a world were graphics and speed really matters, who wouldn’t want to own the best gaming PC there is.

Speed
Current computer games have placed a great demand on the computer’s hardware. These computer games demand too much as too requiring a fast central processing unit (CPU) in order to function. Initially CPU manufacturers relied on increasing clock rate to improve the performance of their processors. By the year 2005, manufacturers have begun to adapt multi-core CPU technology, which allows the computer to process multiple tasks simultaneously. This allows the computer to use more complex graphics, artificial intelligence, and in-game physics which are core elements in modern computer games.

Graphics 
Many 3D computer games also demand more on a powerful graphics processing unit (GPU) which is responsible for accelerating the process of drawing complex scenes in real time instances. These GPU’s can be integrated on the computer’s motherboard or come packaged with a discrete graphics card. Some modern computer games require physics processing units (PPU), which accelerates physics simulations in modern computer games. These PPUs allows the PC to process more complex interactions among objects which can’t be accommodated by the CPU.

Sound cards are also vital in a pre-dominantly 3D computer games. This hardware provides for improved and enhanced 3D audio of the game.

So what is the Best Gaming Computer then…
The idea of building the Best Gaming Computer is one that has crossed many computer gamers’ mind around the world. But when this idea also comes into play, two schools of thought come into light.

One school of thought is that the Best Gaming Computer is one that has garnered the best and powerful specifications available in the market. PC’s are constructed after a list of computer components found out to be the best gaming machines based on specifications. This is “The Best in the Market” school of thought.

On the other hand, there is also a idea that instead of building the best gaming computer based on the best specifications in the market, one should build the best gaming computer based on the user’s needs. People pursuing this school of thought construct their best gaming computer based on a list of computer components found out to be needed by the user and not what’s the best in the market. This practical school of thought is called “The Best for You” school of thought.

The “Best in the Market” School of Thought
People who are considering that big guns are the best should follow this school of thought. This school of thought believes that the best gaming computer is the one equipped with the best and latest computer component in the market.

The main advantage of this school of thought is that users are assured that they will be enjoying the fastest and best quality (in terms of graphics and speed) experience for their computer games. They can easily play graphically demanding computer games at higher resolutions without a problem.

The main disadvantage of the “Best in the Market” School of Thought is more on the financial aspect. In order to achieve such a gaming computer with the best components in its specifications could shave out thousands, or even tens of thousands, from your budget. If you want the Best then be prepared to pay the price, of course, big guns cost a lot you know.

If you still want to pursue this school of thought and you have the budget to afford such a price then you can visit several websites to check on the best computer components in the market.

The “Best for You” School of Thought
For practical gamers, this school of thought is what suits them best. This school of thought believes that the best gaming computer is one that fits the user’s needs and not the user’s wants.

The main advantage of this school of thought is that it is able to address your gaming computer needs with the less amount of money to shell-out for it. Gaming computers constructed with this in mind may not be the best or fastest there is in the market or in the world, but it is one which is easy on the user’s pocket while delivering the needed specifications to be able to function when playing modern computer games.

If you want to follow this school of thought in constructing the best gaming computer for your needs, here are some hints and questions that you must keep in mind:

Functionality
1. What will I used my computer for?
2. Will I use my computer solely for gaming?
3. Or will I also use for other purpose: such as listening to music, editing pictures, watching movies, chatting with buddies, or surfing the Internet?

Consider the gaming computer you are going to buy or construct. If you are going to use it for simple tasks; it would be a waste of money to spend on high-end computer components if you really don’t need that much power for these simple tasks.

Practicality
4. Do I really need that much power?
5. Is 50MHz really worth having?

Ask yourself if you really need those extra MHz or MB that a high-end computer component can provide you. For example, it is great to have a Quad-SLI machine with four nVidia 8800 Ultras powered by a Quad Core Extreme Processor. But do you really need that much power if you just want to play The Sims 2, which can adequate run on a low-cost GeForce graphics card?

For people who are advocating this school of thought, they always believe that “the hardware you are buying today might be outdated tomorrow, so why buy expensive one when it will be outdated after a few months?”

In the end, if you want to follow this school of thought always remember to ask the ultimate question:Is it worth it?

Fifth Generation of Computers

Earlier Generations of Computing

The first generation of computing is generally thought of as the “vacuum tube era.” These computers used large vacuum tubes as their circuits, and large metal drums as their memory. They generated a tremendous amount of heat and, as any computer professional can tell attest, this led to a large number of failures and crashes in the early years of computing. This first generation of computer lasted for sixteen years, between 1940 and 1956, and was characterized by massive computers that could fill an entire room. The most notable of these large, and yet quite basic, computers, were the UNIVAC and ENIAC models.

Second-generation computing was characterized by a switch from vacuum tubes to transistors, and saw a significant decrease in the size of computing devices. Invented in 1947, the transistor came to computers in 1956. Its popularity and utility in computing machines lasted until 1963, when integrated circuits supplanted them. However, transistors remain an important part of modern computing. Even modern-day Intel chips contain tens of millions of transistors – although microscopic in size, and not nearly as power-draining as their much earlier predecessors.

Between 1964 and 1971, computing began to take baby steps toward the modern era. During this third generation of computing, the semiconductor increased the speed and efficiency of computers by leaps and bounds, while simultaneously shrinking them even further in size. These semiconductors used miniaturized transistors which were much smaller than the traditional transistor found in earlier computers, and put them on a silicon chip. This is still the basis for modern processors, though on a much, much smaller scale.

In 1971, computing hit the big time: microprocessing. Microprocessors can be found in every single computing device today, from desktops and laptops to tablets and smartphones. They contain thousands of integrated circuits that are housed on a single chip. Their parts are microscopic, allowing one small processor to handle many simultaneous tasks at the same time with very little loss of processing speed or capacity.

Because of their extremely small size and large processing capacity, microprocessors enabled the home computing industry to flourish. IBM introduced the very first personal computer in 1981; three years later, Apple followed with its wildly successful Apple line of computers that revolutionized the industry and made the microprocessor industry a mainstay in the American economy.

Chip manufacturers like AMD and Intel sprouted up and flourished in Silicon Valley alongside established brands like IBM. Their mutual innovation and competitive spirit led to the most rapid advancement of computer processing speed and power in the history of computing; and enabled a marketplace that is today dominated by handheld devices which are infinitely more powerful than the room-sized computers of just a half-century ago.

Fifth Generation of Computing

Technology never stops evolving and improving, however. While the microprocessor has revolutionized the computing industry, the fifth generation of computer looks to turn the whole industry on its head once again. The fifth generation of computing is called “artificial intelligence,” and it is the goal of computer scientists and developers to eventually create computers than outsmart, outwit, and maybe even outlast their human inventors.

The fifth generation of computer has already beaten humans in a number of games – most notably a 1997 game of chess against the man who was then the game’s world champion. But where it can beat humans in very methodical gameplay, fifth generation computing lacks the ability to understand natural human speech and affectation. Artificial intelligence is not yet as intelligent as it needs to be in order to interact with its human counterparts and – more importantly – truly understand them.

But strides have been made. Many computers and smartphones on the market contain a rudimentary voice recognition feature that can translate human speech into text. However, they still require slow, very punctual dictation – otherwise words become jumbled or erroneous. And they’re still not receptive to human affectation which might indicate the needs for capital letters, question marks, or things such as bold and italicized type.

As microprocessors continue to increase their power by leaps and bounds, it will becoming possible for these hallmarks of artificial intelligence to become easier to develop and implement. It’s easy to underestimate the complexity of human language and patterns of communication, but the simple fact is that translating those things into raw computing power and ability requires a great deal of time and resources – in some cases, resources that have yet to be fully developed and put into a computer chip.

TechiWarehouse.Com is a very simple yet informative site to say the least. The whole point of this website is to let programmers, network technicians, database designers, computer beginners, etc… of all kinds to come here, quickly look for what they want, and get the heck out. The purpose of the internet is to provide and share information, quickly and efficiently. So why keep the general population of the web away? Whether the visitor is a code, web, script, or designer programmer; network admin, user, part of a workgroup; and so on there is something here for all. Since people should stick to what they do best, we have sworn not to let down the IT/Web community.

Importance of Mobile Phone in Our Daily Life

Mobiles phones have intruded in our lives and have made their own unique stand. Once considered as a luxury is now the thing closest to our hearts. Mobiles have even replaced the wristwatches people now find it easier to see the time in their mobile phones. Mobiles phones have become the personal dairies for many. A mobile phone acts like your mother and wakes you up in the morning; it is your reminder that keeps you updated of all your meetings and important events. Calculator and notes section has made the mobile phone your personal assistant. Mobile phones because of their varied multi-function capabilities have replaced many other devices.

When you are stressed and need some music to soothe your soul then just turning on your music player on your mobile will work for you. Now a day’s most mobile phones have a music player or an FM receiver. This will ensure that you won’t get bored at any point of time. Phones have also popularized the camera feature. Now point-and-shoot imaging has been rediscovered with the mobile phone camera. Mobile phones now offer expandable memory features. This has enabled the user to store multiple files and multimedia in his phone. Phones have even introduced a hard disk in them and this has increased the memory capabilities of the phone tremendously. Mobile phones now flaunt up to 8 GB of memory expansion.

Accessing the internet has become mandatory in many professions. Now mobile phone is also replacing the laptop by enabling internet access through the mobile phone. This has given way to service providers to provide various internet services. Mobile banking and stocks updates have become a common affair for the mobile phone user. Mobile phones are still a style statement to many; this depends upon the kind of phone you purchase.

Mobile phones are available below one grand and the cost runs up to tens of thousands. There are diamond-studded phones which add to the class and status of a person. Mobiles phones are best know for their communication purpose, calling from anywhere anytime and going transnational has enabled increased communication among people. The lowering of call rates in only helping and this technology is reaching the rural areas to enable higher communication in them.

Mobile phone has popularized the messaging service and this has made it easy for people to send across messages and nearly wiping out the traditional lettering system. Thus mobile phone has intervened in our lives in a positive manner and continues to make it better.
There are many websites are present on the net where you can buy mobile phone and get the discount also.

Beware the Seductive Power of Technology

I Like Technology. I’m conceding all the good and fun things that computer-based technology has brought into our lives; I’ll not fight that battle. Not only would I lose any argument against the wonderful additions technology has made to our lives, I would be fighting against myself. I love it that I can flip open a Star Trek “communicator” and talk to almost anyone, anytime. I love the very idea of having a communication device out in my back yard, near the bird feeder, that is communicating with a satellite in low earth orbit. Wow! And do I ever love my computer-oops, computers. As in many computers. In fact, my job is strongly tied to technology and I love to get paid. However, this article is a warning, a plea to open our eyes wider than our big screen TVs, to step back out of cell phone range, to put down our PDAs for a minute and look at what has gotten a hold on us.

Technology is Seductive

Technology has the power to draw us in and cause us to lose perspective about what is happening. Just try talking to your child (or maybe your spouse or best friend) the next time some slick TV program or commercial is shimmering across the screen and you’ll see what has all of their attention. Technology draws us in. But if we’re drawn in, we’re also leaving something behind. We could be abandoning loving or developing relationships or the quiet time necessary to think purposefully about our lives, where we are going and how we want to live five years from now. To continue this idea, that technology is seductive, let’s look at the natural progression of how we respond to new technology.

Technology as a Toy

All new technology comes to us in the guise of a toy, thus its initial seductive pull on us. No matter the age, the new technology feels like a toy. It is smooth, pretty and flashes little lights. It makes cute sounds and we respond to it from the childlike (or childish) center of our being. It is not the sophisticated 35 year old business executive that is responding to the new all-purpose, highly-evolved technology thing, it is instead the seven year old child inside that is gushing and filled with Christmas morning lust. We might not even have any way to use it yet, but we play with it. We turn channels, set the volume on the 96 surround sound speakers (yours doesn’t have 96?), take pictures of our toes with it, and enthusiastically pursue carpel tunnel problems as quickly as our thumbs and fingers can fly over fun little colored buttons. It is a toy. But it does move evolve into our next category and that makes us feel a little better about it and helps us avoid the fact that we just spent a year of future retirement on a toy.

Technology as a Tool

The toy usually becomes a tool. In our strong desires to justify the purchase of the toy, we look for things it can do. Ah, it keeps my calendar. Cool! Now I won’t have to keep track of my $29.00 day planner and worry about losing it. I just need to worry about losing my $495 PDA. But it can also take pictures. That’s important. It’s also good that it can erase them because I find I take a lot of pictures that are really crap and now I not only spent time taking the pictures, I also get to spend time erasing them. But the toys often turn into very serious tools. I may continue to use my cell phone toy as I unconsciously blow through red lights and make turns without signaling (need that spare arm for the cell), but I also realize this toy is a serious safety tool. I don’t want to be broken down on the highway and not have this link to help. The same 50″ flat screen wall hanging that is a toy is also a tool to be aware of threatening weather and important current events. And the notebook computer that empowers me to look at pictures of potential Russian brides helps me write this article and project investment returns. Toys have the potential of becoming tools. From puppies to working dogs. But there is a third and more dangerous level.

Technology as a Tyrant

Dictionary.com offers one definition of a tyrant as, “a tyrannical or compulsory influence.” Wow! Think cellphone, e-mail, Skype, compulsive checking of forums, chat rooms, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and all the other current flavors of Turkish delight known as technology. These things can be toys (relatively harmless except for what they might be replacing), they can be tools, or they can become tyrants. When deeply engrained into our work or social structure, they change from being puppies or work dogs and become pit bulls that can bite and clamp down so that it is very difficult to dislodge them. I used to be able to keep up with the demands of my job. Once upon a time I actually had a little time that I could budget weekly that was “walk around and get to know everyone better” time. No more. Now I am constantly juggling attention among appointments, drop-in unannounced visitors, snail mail, phone calls with the pink reminders, cell phone calls, and e-mail. I can never get one caught up without intrusions from all of the others. The first four were barely manageable, with cell and e-mail added, I’m no longer in control, the pit bull is. So, what happened?

How Did We Get Like This?

Okay. Here is the crux of this article. Technology is on a different evolutionary rate than us humans. It reproduces faster than mice and changes species with each generation. We were enticed, and continue to be enticed, by technology due to its seductive dark side. It beckons to the seven year old inside and draws us in. As a tool, technology is embraced and embedded into our lives, seemingly as a partner, one called alongside of us to help us. But, without an understanding of the evolutionary path of technology, we do not control its place in our lives. It becomes a tyrant that bullies us and pulls us around on its lease instead of the other way around. Because of the initial seductive nature of technology, we don’t easily see that it will tend to take us to where we don’t want to go and make us pay more than we first thought we were willing to pay. So, what shall we then do?

What We Must Do

I’m not offering a plan but an approach. The approach depends upon fully understanding what has gotten a grip on us. I suggest the following critical pieces for beginning to manage technology and protect our humanity:

  • Clearly see that technology is seductive and separate out and control the childish reactions to the initial toy aspects of new technology. Gratification can be delayed (an adult response) and toys can be both played with and put away.
  • Think through both intended and unintended consequences of bringing a shiny, new technology toy into your life. What is it replacing? How will you control it so it doesn’t put you on a leash?
  • Do not assume that a new technology tool is better than an older one that worked well for you in the past. I have a colleague who keeps in a pocket a little list of things to do, thoughts, and insights. His pen and paper list worked a lot better than my PDA when when my technology tool lost both primary and backup batteries and I lost passwords to multiple accounts and forums. Which is better?
  • Many new technology tools cannot be avoided. However, they can be managed. Think of ways to limit their use and how to communicate your policies for your use to your colleagues, family, and friends. For example, I check my email once a day and make it clear to my colleagues that I am not sitting at my computer all day waiting for the chime (evidently, they are).
  • Finally, pay attention to the things that technology tends to replace and redouble your effort to work on relationships so you have no regrets.

Monitoring Employee Internet Use

The Internet has become an invaluable resource in the workplace, the world’s biggest reference library, social media center, and pornography outlet is now only a click away. This availability presents a significant risk factor for employer liability and costs employers thousands of hours in productivity each day. Monitoring employee internet use is one way to reduce employer liability, and whether or not you agree with the principles behind internet monitoring, many employers agree that it is a necessary evil.

Internet abusers range from upper management employees in private offices viewing hardcore pornography, to the department assistant in a cubicle that spends 3 hours a day doing online shopping, making travel arrangements, and paying bills through the company Internet. Internet abuse is endemic in the workplace and organizations are being forced to face the problem head on, or suffer the consequences.

Among the many consequences of internet abuse is a loss of productivity and scores of litigation issues such as sexual harassment, hostile work environment and discrimination. Monitoring Employee Internet access is one way that an organization can limit its liability.

Defining Internet Abuse

Defining Internet abuse is the first challenge, and creating an organization wide acceptable use policy (AUP) is the first step in the definition. An AUP defines what constitutes internet abuse in your organization. What was acceptable internet behavior in one organization may be unacceptable in another, so the AUP is a highly customized policy, based on the organizational mission. The organization determines what lines will be drawn when it comes to internet abuse.

The key to a successful AUP implementation in most organizations is similar to other policy development issues in the workplace. There must be “buy-in” from the “top-down”, in other words, the leaders of the organization must agree to the principles of the AUP and endeavor to push that policy down to the directors, managers and supervisors within the organization. The most critical stage of AUP development is dependent on upper management “buy-in” and their willingness to demonstrate the importance of this policy to the rest of the organization.

Internet Workshops

Holding a series of Internet workshops with the employees of your organization is one way to introduce your new acceptable use policy. As an educational session, an internet workshop can address the sensitive issues surrounding internet abuse in an open forum where employees can ask questions and provide input in a non-confrontational setting.

During the internet workshop, the organization can begin to educate the employees about Internet abuse and give them a chance to re-evaluate their internet habits at work. It is important to be as open as possible with your employees regarding your chosen methodology for enforcing the AUP.

For example, if the organization has decided to employ internet blocking technologies, the AUP should define the specific types of websites that will be blocked, for example, many organizations block pornography, “gross depictions” and “hate” websites. Discussing the types of websites the organization has decided to block and answering questions regarding the reasons for blocking will reinforce the organizational mission, and demonstrate the types of websites that are inappropriate within your organization.

If your organization is going to monitor and report on employee internet access, the workshop will give you a chance to show the employees what the internet reports look like, and discuss the circumstances in which they will be used. Taking the mystery out of what the organization is planning in regards to internet monitoring and blocking will reduce employee speculation and set new expectations throughout the organization.

Problems with Internet Monitoring

The technical aspects of blocking website access and monitoring employee internet access are not without problems. The software for blocking websites has advanced tremendously over the past 5 years; however, there are still problems with blocking “all” inappropriate websites and blocking websites that you did not intend to block. No system is perfect and you will need assistance from your selected software / hardware vendor in addition to your information systems department.

If possible, it is always better to meet, in person, with the vendor representatives prior to the purchase of any internet monitoring software. Voice your concerns with the vendor and secure “after sale” support with the vendor help desk. If you have an information systems department, make sure they are involved from the start of the project to help address any technical problems that the new system could bring.

Monitoring Employee Internet Access- the People Side

Outside of the technical issues that will occur, the people side of internet monitoring can be the most problematic of all. Even with the dissemination of information given at the internet workshop and taking great care during your policy development, some employees will, inevitably feel that internet monitoring is unfair. Given this fact, it is of the utmost importance that the internet reports are accurate, beyond question. Even if they are correct, there are still issues to consider. The scenarios listed below are examples of how employees could react if they are confronted with the accusation of internet abuse. Moreover, the excuses below may be completely accurate and good explanation by the accused.

“It wasn’t me!”

It’s always possible that some other person was on the accused employee’s computer surfing the Internet. Once a user steps away from the computer anything can happen. Another person sits down and starts using the computer logged in as the accused, everything they do on the Internet is recorded under somebody else’s name. One suggestion is to have the user lock their computer before leaving for an extended period of time; this will reduce the chances of misidentification of the internet abuser.

“They have my password”

This is a similar situation to the one mentioned above, if I have a user’s password, I could log-in as the user and all of my internet access would be attributed to them. How they got the password is another issue entirely, however the user makes a good point and has a potentially valid excuse for an internet report that shows abuse.

“The Internet Report is Wrong”

This can occur if the monitoring software is setup incorrectly or if there are network issues causing identification problems. This is another reason why you want your information systems department involved from the start and technical support from the vendor who sold you the internet monitoring solution. Defending a internet report that shows abuse is a difficult when you don’t understand how the technical aspects of internet monitoring work.

The Bottom Line

Internet reporting is not an exact science, the reports could be wrong, and the person accused of Internet abuse may be completely innocent. The key is to research the potential offender and look into their history. People who abuse the internet usually have a history of doing so, so look into their past Internet use first and then look at the internet records on their computer. In short, do a “reality check”. Too often we take technology for its word and fail to look on the human side for insight that may confirm or make us question our suspicions. This practice will help reduce the number of errors that could be made during the investigation of internet abuse, and help the employer maintain their credibility.

Summary

Internet abuse is a fact of life in most large organizations today. Monitoring employee internet use and employing blocking technologies can be helpful in reducing employer liability and improving employee productivity. Developing an acceptable use policy to outline acceptable internet behavior in your organization is the first step in the process. To implement this policy successfully, the policy must be supported by upper, mid, and line level managers. The organization should endeavor, with enthusiasm, to educate the employees of the organization about internet abuse and share the organizations plans to monitoring use and block inappropriate websites.

Prior to purchasing a software or hardware solution for internet monitoring / blocking, a vendor should be selected and invited into the organization to explain the technical problems that can occur with internet monitoring and blocking technologies. During this vendor selection process it is very important to include your information systems department and other technical staff. Arranging after-sale support with your vendor of choice is highly recommended.

Finally, there is the people side of the problem. Internet monitoring and blocking are only as good as the software and hardware solutions that are developed. There are many ways that these solutions can fail, so doing a thorough investigation prior to accusing an employee of internet abuse is also highly recommended.

How Technology Creates Wealth

Markets create energy because they are dynamic. They are constantly evolving in response to changes in the economic, political and technological environments. Understanding what causes a market to evolve helps you predict where opportunities will emerge; how fast they will develop, and when and whether mass adoption will occur. If you can capture this energy, you can use it to drive the sales process.

Dynamic systems create energy. If left unchecked, any systemic change tends to grow. A snowball rolling downhill gets bigger. Growth creates momentum. As the snowball grows bigger, it goes faster. Momentum creates energy. The faster the snowball rolls; the bigger it gets; the harder it hits the tree. Energy drives change. (Source The Fifth Discipline)

You can use the energy sources created by an evolving market to motivate prospects to buy your solution. Persuading people to try out a new technology is an uphill battle. You have to invest a lot of your precious energy – sales resources, capital, technical expertise, etc. – into convincing prospects they can benefit from using your technology to support their business. However, if you understand what is driving market change- an increasingly mobile workforce, higher need for personal security, faster access to global markets – then you use the energy created by the market to motivate prospects to buy. Thus, you need to invest less of your own resources and you can sell more productively and efficiently.

Technology markets create abundance.

There are two laws that explain why technology-enabled markets generate extraordinary amounts of energy.
1. Moore’s Law predicts that technology is going to improve in the future and cost less.
2 Metcalf’s Law states that technologies become more useful as more people use them.

The combination of these two laws creates an economy of abundance that is unique to technology markets. As Moore’s Law predicts an endless supply of ever-increasing resources and Metcalf’s Law promises that innovations will be quickly adopted, the nature of the economy changes.

Gordon Moore, the founder of Intel, said, “Every 18 months processing power doubles while the cost holds constant.” The implications of Moore’s Law are that every 18 months technology is going to cost half as much and be twice as powerful. Moore’s Law has held true for over 30 years. Previous economies were based on the laws of scarcity, where you have a limited amount of resources and value is based on how scarce they are – gold, oil, land, etc. The more you use up the resources the less energy you have.

A technology-based economy is based on the laws of abundance. According to Moore’s law, there will always be cheaper resources tomorrow. This ever-increasing pool of resources enables customers to implement new business strategies. If it isn’t possible today, it will be possible tomorrow. Improved technology is constantly fueling the market, creating energy.

Furthermore, thanks to this simple formula technological obsolescence is only a few months away. Customers can never afford to sit still for fear that a competitor will be able to leapfrog ahead of them if they adopt the next generation of technology faster. This anxiety is another powerful source of energy that you can use to drive your sales.

Metcalf’s Law also has a powerful effect on developing markets. Robert Metcalf, the founder of 3Com, said “New technologies are valuable only if many people use them… the utility of a network equates the square of the number of users. ” This means that the more people use a technology, the more useful it becomes. If there was only one fax machine in the world, it wouldn’t be useful. With two fax machines you can send mail back and forth faster and cheaper than if you send it through the post office. With 2,000,000 fax machines, you never have to wait in line at the post office again.

According to Metcalf a technology’s usefulness equals the number of users squared. If two people use a fax it is four times easier than using the postal system. If 20 people use the fax machine, it is 400 times easier. This creates a geometric increase in the technology’s utility, which is just another way of saying why customers would want to buy it. So if 2 people want to buy a fax machine today; 4 people will want to buy it tomorrow; 16 people will want to buy it the day after tomorrow; 256 people will want to buy it next week, and 2,147,483,648 will want to buy it by the end of the month. That is a lot of potential customers lining up to buy your product, which is what market energy is all about.

Abundance creates demand for your technology. Since technology markets create abundance they are not subject to the constraints of scarcity. They have unlimited growth potential and consequently unlimited potential to create wealth.